Filter By

  • Alice

Contact

Department Secretary: Ms. Meital Biton
E-mail: meitalb@savion.huji.ac.il
Tel : +97225883581 Fax: +97225881245
Room 4503, Humanities Building  

Chair & BA Advisor: Prof. Galia Benziman
E-mail: galia.benziman@mail.huji.ac.il

MA Adivsor: Prof. Yael Levin
E-mail: yael.levin@mail.huji.ac.il

Emeriti

Shuli Barzilai

Shuli Barzilai

Shuli Barzilai is Professor of English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her books include Lacan and the Matter of Origins (Stanford UP, 1999), a study of the development of Jacques Lacan’s thinking about the mother’s role in psychical formation, and Tales of Bluebeard and His Wives from Late Antiquity to Postmodern Times (Routledge, 2009) in which she traces how the Bluebeard story is retold from the situated perspectives of writers such as Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anne Thackeray Ritchie, Angela Carter, and Margaret Atwood. Her essay

Isaac Benabu

Isaac Benabu

Isaac Benabu is Professor in Theatre Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His interest in Renaissance Drama in general and in Shakespeare in particular has led him over the last few years to an investigation of the problematics of reading the play-text from a theatrical vantage-point, and to do so he has drawn on the debates surrounding Reception Theory and Reader Response Theory.
Until recently, approaches to the analysis of theatre were based on critical models devised for the understanding of prose-fiction, where the aesthetic effect of the work is contained within the perimeter of an individuated reader reaction. Theatre, on the other hand, aims not at the private reader’s “confessional” but at the communal effect upon and reaction of an audience, and any academic study of the subject should acknowledge the difference in aim.

Sanford Budick

Sanford Budick

Sanford Budick  received his A.B. from Harvard College in 1963 and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1966. Before being appointed Professor of English at The Hebrew University he was Professor of English at Cornell University. At The Hebrew University he served twice as chair of the English department, was a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies, and was founding-director (1980-2000) of the Center for Literary Studies. He is the recipient of Guggenheim and NEH Fellowships. He has written books on Dryden, on eighteenth-century poetry, on Milton, on Kant’s relation to Milton, and on the Western theory of tradition.

Judy Levy

Judy Levy

Judith Levy is Senior Teacher (retired) in the Dept. of English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of V. S. Naipaul: Displacement and Autobiography (Garland Press, 1995; reissued by Routledge, 2016), and articles on Jane Austen, E. M. Forster, Nadine Gordimer, Christa Wolf and collective memory, among others. 

Shlomith Rimmon Kenan

Shlomith Rimmon Kenan

Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan is Professor Emerita of English and Comparative Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She earned her B.A and M.A degrees, summa cum laude, at the Hebrew University. Received her Ph.D from the University of London and did her postdoctoral studies at Yale University and Paris. She is a theoretician of literature an internationally respected narratologist. Her books – The Concept of Ambiguity, The Example of James; Narrative Fiction: Contemporary Poetics; A Glance beyond Doubt: Narration, Representation, Subjectivity – are widely acclaimed, and the second has been translated into eight languages. Prof. Rimmon-Kenan has also published numerous essays in professional periodicals both about narratology and about specific authors like James, Faulkner, Nabokov, Morrison, and others. In the last few years Prof. Rimmon-Kenan has been exploring interdisciplinary junctions like literature and psychoanalysis, law, history, and medicine (illness narratives). After joining the Israel Academy (2013), her interdisciplinary research has broadened to include ideology and politics. In collaboration with Prof. Susan Lanser, Brandeis University, USA, she studies narratives concerning the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Together, they organized a few international seminars on the subject and published several essays in prestigious periodicals. And they are still at it! Prof. Rimmon-Kenan supervised 44 doctoral students and was a visiting professor at Harvard and the University of Helsinki. In 2019 she received a prestigious award on behalf of the International Society for the Study of Narrative: The Wayne C.Booth Lifetime Achievement Award. She is married, mother of two and grandmother of one..

Leona Toker

Leona Toker

02-5883583

Leona Toker is Professor Emerita of English Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Nabokov: The Mystery of Literary Structures (1989), Eloquent Reticence: Withholding Information in Fictional Narrative (1993), Return from the Archipelago: Narratives of Gulag Survivors (2000), Towards the Ethics of Form in Fiction: Narratives of Cultural Remission (2010), Gulag Literature and the Literature of Nazi Camps: An Intercontextual Reading (2019), and articles on English, American, and Russian writers. She is Editor of Partial Answers: Journal of Literature and the History of Ideas, a semiannual refereed academic periodical sponsored by the Institute for Literatures of the Faculty of Humanities, The Hebrew University. Her current research deals with narratological issues and with Vladimir Nabokov’s midlife works.

Jon Whitman

Jon Whitman

02-5883781

Jon Whitman is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where for many years he also directed the Center for Literary Studies. His research explores the interaction of intellectual and imaginative changes from antiquity to the modern period. He is the author of Allegory: The Dynamics of an Ancient and Medieval Technique (co-published by Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press in 1987) and the editor of two collective studies: Interpretation and Allegory: Antiquity to the Modern Period (published by Brill in 2000) and Romance and History: Imagining Time from the Medieval to the Early Modern Period (published by Cambridge University Press in 2015).