Emeriti

Shuli Barzilai

Shuli Barzilai

Shuli Barzilai is Professor of English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her books include Lacan and the Matter of Origins (Stanford UP, 1999), a study of the development of Jacques Lacan’s thinking about the mother’s role in psychical formation, and Tales of Bluebeard and His Wives from Late Antiquity to Postmodern Times (Routledge, 2009) in which she traces how the Bluebeard story is retold from the situated perspectives of writers such as Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anne Thackeray Ritchie, Angela Carter, and Margaret Atwood. Her essay

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“Reading ‘Snow White’: The Mother’s Story,” first published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (1990), has been anthologized and frequently taught in courses on feminism, critical theory, and autoethnography. Her essays have also appeared in Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction,Diacritics, Dickens Quarterly, Marvels & Tales, Partial Answers, PMLA, Victorian Literature and Culture, and Word & Image, among other journals, and in edited collections, including Critical Insights: Margaret Atwood (2012), Channeling Wonder: Fairy Tales on Television (2014) and The Cambridge Companion to Fairy Tales (2015).

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Isaac Benabu

Isaac Benabu

benabu@mail.huji.ac.il

Isaac Benabu is Professor in Theatre Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His interest in Renaissance Drama in general and in Shakespeare in particular has led him over the last few years to an investigation of the problematics of reading the play-text from a theatrical vantage-point, and to do so he has drawn on the debates surrounding Reception Theory and Reader Response Theory.

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Until recently, approaches to the analysis of theatre were based on critical models devised for the understanding of prose-fiction, where the aesthetic effect of the work is contained within the perimeter of an individuated reader reaction. Theatre, on the other hand, aims not at the private reader’s “confessional” but at the communal effect upon and reaction of an audience, and any academic study of the subject should acknowledge the difference in aim.The theatrical text in the academy was usually read as a literary text, and when textual debates of the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century subsided, a plethora of interpretative trends emerged often based on models evolved for the study of literature. And though Performance Theory has flourished since, concentrating among other things on all the silent aspects of the theatrical text, there is a relatively small body of work which approaches the theatrical text as a manual for performance, a manual in which the playwright has encoded the directives for staging.  In the case of Renaissance dramatists, the problem is particularly interesting because the convention was not to supply Shavian-long stage-directions but rather to encode the “notation” within the play-text itself.  In an age when the relationship between playwright, company and theatre was much closer than it is in our own day, and when written parts were addressed to the actors to enable them to memorize their parts (the lucrative potential of the printed text was discovered by entrepreneurial printers of varying scruples), exploration of the encoded theatrical stage-directions gives a fresh perspective to an understanding of the theatre of the period.

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Shlomith Rimmon Kenan

Shlomith Rimmon Kenan

Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan is Professor Emerita of English and Comparative Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She earned her B.A and M.A degrees, summa cum laude, at the Hebrew University. Received her Ph.D from the University of London and did her postdoctoral studies at Yale University and Paris. She is a theoretician of literature an internationally respected narratologist.

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Her books – The Concept of Ambiguity, The Example of James; Narrative Fiction: Contemporary Poetics; A Glance beyond Doubt: Narration, Representation, Subjectivity – are widely acclaimed, and the second has been translated into eight languages. Prof. Rimmon-Kenan has also published numerous essays in professional periodicals both about narratology and about specific authors like James, Faulkner, Nabokov, Morrison, and others. In the last few years Prof. Rimmon-Kenan has been exploring interdisciplinary junctions like literature and psychoanalysis, law, history, and medicine (illness narratives). After joining the Israel Academy (2013), her interdisciplinary research has broadened to include ideology and politics. In collaboration with Prof. Susan Lanser, Brandeis University, USA, she studies narratives concerning the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Together, they organized a few international seminars on the subject and published several essays in prestigious periodicals. And they are still at it! Prof. Rimmon-Kenan supervised 44 doctoral students and was a visiting professor at Harvard and the University of Helsinki. In 2019 she received a prestigious award on behalf of the International Society for the Study of Narrative: The Wayne C.Booth Lifetime Achievement Award. She is married, mother of two and grandmother of one..

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Eynel Wardi

Eynel Wardi

02-5883980
mseynel@mscc.huji.ac.il

Eynel Wardi is a Senior Lecturer in the English Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Once Below a Time: Dylan Thomas, Julia Kristeva, and Other Speaking Subjects (2000).

Jon Whitman

Jon Whitman

02-5883781
msjdw@mscc.huji.ac.il

Jon Whitman is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where for many years he also directed the Center for Literary Studies. His research explores the interaction of intellectual and imaginative changes from antiquity to the modern period. He is the author of Allegory: The Dynamics of an Ancient and Medieval Technique (co-published by Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press in 1987) and the editor of two collective studies: Interpretation and Allegory: Antiquity to the Modern Period (published by Brill in 2000) and Romance and History: Imagining Time from the Medieval to the Early Modern Period (published by Cambridge University Press in 2015). 

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